"You are mortal, you age, you die. If that is not hell, pray tell me, what is?"

strictly-hydroponic:

liftedandgiftedd:

oh my god my fucking childhood. these shows taught me waaay more than any class in school ever did.

Saammeee
Source: thelifeofnachos

(via tattoos-with-acid)

Source: fvck-time

(via inkedskeleton)

Source: it-s-more-than-just-a-band

justgethigh:

The Super-Charged Story of Marijuana

Source: justgethigh

sagaciouscejai:

mamasam:

Rum. Goldschlager. Gin. Vodka.
Only the avatar, master of all four alcohols, could get this shit cranked.

but when the party needed him most, he got sober.

sagaciouscejai:

mamasam:

Rum. Goldschlager. Gin. Vodka.

Only the avatar, master of all four alcohols, could get this shit cranked.

but when the party needed him most, he got sober.

(via tattooedthespian)

Source: dominiricanlove

kush-princess:

Fin “I lost my pipe man..”Jake “dont worry I got you”

kush-princess:

Fin “I lost my pipe man..”
Jake “dont worry I got you”

(via darth-kitty-the-moon-princess)

Source: these-lumping-lumps

hugs-for-drugs:


Behind my house some dude did this

hugs-for-drugs:

Behind my house some dude did this

(via darth-kitty-the-moon-princess)

Source: hugs-for-drugs

im-dazed:

Time bomb

im-dazed:

Time bomb

(via andthesorcerersstoned)

Source: im-dazed

(via godshideouscreation)

Source: heroinych

kenobi-wan-obi:

Did a hyper-black hole spawn the Universe?

It could be time to bid the Big Bang bye-bye. Cosmologists have speculated that the Universe formed from the debris ejected when a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole — a scenario that would help to explain why the cosmos seems to be so uniform in all directions.
The standard Big Bang model tells us that the Universe exploded out of an infinitely dense point, or singularity. But nobody knows what would have triggered this outburst: the known laws of physics cannot tell us what happened at that moment.
“For all physicists know, dragons could have come flying out of the singularity,” says Niayesh Afshordi, an astrophysicist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada.
It is also difficult to explain how a violent Big Bang would have left behind a Universe that has an almost completely uniform temperature, because there does not seem to have been enough time since the birth of the cosmos for it to have reached temperature equilibrium.
To most cosmologists, the most plausible explanation for that uniformity is that, soon after the beginning of time, some unknown form of energy made the young Universe inflate at a rate that was faster than the speed of light. That way, a small patch with roughly uniform temperature would have stretched into the vast cosmos we see today. But Afshordi notes that “the Big Bang was so chaotic, it’s not clear there would have been even a small homogenous patch for inflation to start working on”.
On the brane
In a paper posted last week on the arXiv preprint server, Afshordi and his colleagues turn their attention to a proposal made in 2000 by a team including Gia Dvali, a physicist now at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany. In that model, our three-dimensional (3D) Universe is a membrane, or brane, that floats through a ‘bulk universe’ that has four spatial dimensions.
Ashfordi’s team realized that if the bulk universe contained its own four-dimensional (4D) stars, some of them could collapse, forming 4D black holes in the same way that massive stars in our Universe do: they explode as supernovae, violently ejecting their outer layers, while their inner layers collapse into a black hole.
In our Universe, a black hole is bounded by a spherical surface called an event horizon. Whereas in ordinary three-dimensional space it takes a two-dimensional object (a surface) to create a boundary inside a black hole, in the bulk universe the event horizon of a 4D black hole would be a 3D object — a shape called a hypersphere. When Afshordi’s team modelled the death of a 4D star, they found that the ejected material would form a 3D brane surrounding that 3D event horizon, and slowly expand.
The authors postulate that the 3D Universe we live in might be just such a brane — and that we detect the brane’s growth as cosmic expansion. “Astronomers measured that expansion and extrapolated back that the Universe must have begun with a Big Bang — but that is just a mirage,” says Afshordi.

Full Article

kenobi-wan-obi:

Did a hyper-black hole spawn the Universe?

It could be time to bid the Big Bang bye-bye. Cosmologists have speculated that the Universe formed from the debris ejected when a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole — a scenario that would help to explain why the cosmos seems to be so uniform in all directions.

The standard Big Bang model tells us that the Universe exploded out of an infinitely dense point, or singularity. But nobody knows what would have triggered this outburst: the known laws of physics cannot tell us what happened at that moment.

“For all physicists know, dragons could have come flying out of the singularity,” says Niayesh Afshordi, an astrophysicist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada.

It is also difficult to explain how a violent Big Bang would have left behind a Universe that has an almost completely uniform temperature, because there does not seem to have been enough time since the birth of the cosmos for it to have reached temperature equilibrium.

To most cosmologists, the most plausible explanation for that uniformity is that, soon after the beginning of time, some unknown form of energy made the young Universe inflate at a rate that was faster than the speed of light. That way, a small patch with roughly uniform temperature would have stretched into the vast cosmos we see today. But Afshordi notes that “the Big Bang was so chaotic, it’s not clear there would have been even a small homogenous patch for inflation to start working on”.

On the brane

In a paper posted last week on the arXiv preprint server, Afshordi and his colleagues turn their attention to a proposal made in 2000 by a team including Gia Dvali, a physicist now at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany. In that model, our three-dimensional (3D) Universe is a membrane, or brane, that floats through a ‘bulk universe’ that has four spatial dimensions.

Ashfordi’s team realized that if the bulk universe contained its own four-dimensional (4D) stars, some of them could collapse, forming 4D black holes in the same way that massive stars in our Universe do: they explode as supernovae, violently ejecting their outer layers, while their inner layers collapse into a black hole.

In our Universe, a black hole is bounded by a spherical surface called an event horizon. Whereas in ordinary three-dimensional space it takes a two-dimensional object (a surface) to create a boundary inside a black hole, in the bulk universe the event horizon of a 4D black hole would be a 3D object — a shape called a hypersphere. When Afshordi’s team modelled the death of a 4D star, they found that the ejected material would form a 3D brane surrounding that 3D event horizon, and slowly expand.

The authors postulate that the 3D Universe we live in might be just such a brane — and that we detect the brane’s growth as cosmic expansion. “Astronomers measured that expansion and extrapolated back that the Universe must have begun with a Big Bang — but that is just a mirage,” says Afshordi.

Full Article

(via godshideouscreation)

Source: nature.com

ivegotbigbigplans:

this fuckin show

(via godshideouscreation)

Source: ivegotbigbigplans

tomhanksy:

That street art life though.

tomhanksy:

That street art life though.

(via godshideouscreation)

Source: tomhanksy

Text

stonerthings:

Friendly reminder, you can smoke weed and make the world a better place at the same damn time

Source: stonerthings

(via acrylic)

Source: keefrich

tastefullyoffensive:

Pun Dog #6 (previously) [x]

Source: tastefullyoffensive